Goals:
  • Find the relationship between wheel size, motor rotations, and distance traveled by the whole robot
  • Develop a procedure that allows you to convert a linear distance into motor rotations so your robot can move a precise distance you have measured
  • Implement positive teaming, collaboration and interpersonal skills into the group dynamic
  • Teams will plan, prioritize, and manage for results
  • Teams will be adaptable, strive to manage complexity, and operate under self-direction


Wheels and Distance - Group Roles:
(No Last Names & each member should have a different job than the last activity)

Role
Name
Project Manager -
Michael
Programmer -
Will
Materials/Quality Control-
Holly
Communications/Scribe -
Maria


Condition 1.2 - Measure & Predict :


Item

Wheel Diameter
5.1 cm
Circumference of wheel (C=d*Pi)
16.014 cm
Number of Motor rotations (360º = 1 rotation)
2 times
Predicted distance of travel
16.014 cm

Condition 1.3 - Run and Measure


Following the directions, set up a starting point for your Taskbot, however, use a tape measure (not a yard stick). Post a video in the table showing your Taskbots three trials. In the same three columns, post the three distances traveled. Finally, average your trials.


Taskbot video
Trial 1
Trial 2
Trial 3
Average of Trials

18cm
16.5cm
16cm
16.83cm


Condition 1.4 - Evaluation:


  1. Look at the data in your table (Condition 1.3).
  2. Did the robot go the exact same distance in all three trials? What are some possible reasons for these results?
    No, the robots did not go exactly the same distance each time. I think this may be because, the motor
  3. Calculate the average distance that the robot went with these wheels and this program [Average Distance = (distance 1 + distance 2 + distance 3)/3].
    16.83cm
  4. Compare the average to the predicted distance from Table 1.2.
    Prediction - 16.014 Average - 16.83
  5. Was the average of the distances you measured close to what Dr.Turner’s hypothesis predicted it would be?
    Does this support the hypothesis? Why or why not? Is this set of trials alone enough to prove or disprove how valid the
    hypothesis is, in general?
    Yes, the average distance we measured was close to Dr. Turner's hypothesis was close, it was only .816 off. Yes, it does support the hypothesis because, it was very close to what the prediction said. Yes, we think that this set of trials is enough to prove how valid the hypothesis is right, we tested three times and each time it was close to the other trials. So we think that three trials are enough to support the hypothesis.

Condition 2.2 - Measure & Predict : (You are changing the wheels you use. Be sure you have the correct set)


Item

Wheel Diameter
3cm
Circumference of wheel (C=d*Pi)
9.42cm
Number of Motor rotations (360º = 1 rotation)
2
Predicted distance of travel
18.84cm

Run and Measure (Again, video these trials)

Taskbot video
Trial 1
Trial 2
Trial 3
Average of Trials

18.75cm
17.5cm
18cm
18.03cm

Condition 2.3 - Evaluation:



What is the average distance the robot ran with these wheels? Is this average a good representation of the data you gathered in this Condition, or does the data look nothing like the average?
  1. Look at the data in your table.
    i. Were the average measured distances about what Dr. Turner’s hypothesis
    predicted they would be?-Yes, the predictions were very close to the number that it was.

    ii. Do you think you have enough evidence to reasonably accept or reject
    how valid the hypothesis is now?-Yes I think we do have enough evidence to accept the hypothesis because all of the data was so close together, it is easy to conclude that the hypothesis is true.

    iii. If so, do you accept or reject it? If you are not sure, what additional testing
    could you do to help you decide? We accept this hypothesis.